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  • BFA in Interior Architecture

    Los Angeles

  • BFA in Interior Architecture

    Los Angeles

  • BFA in Interior Architecture

    Los Angeles

  • BFA in Interior Architecture

    Los Angeles

  • BFA in Interior Architecture

    Los Angeles

  • BFA in Interior Architecture

    Los Angeles

  • BFA in Interior Architecture

    Los Angeles

Explore the BFA/IA Program

BFA in Interior Architecture

Woodbury’s Los Angeles-Burbank campus offers an accredited four-year Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in Interior Architecture. The program provides students with the analytical, design, and technical skills necessary for success in the interior design professions.

Linking inside design concerns with the world outside the studio, the program explores the intersection of the built environment with society. At this crossroads, Interior Architecture promotes vibrant interior spaces infused with aesthetic and cultural relevance. Coursework combines physical, hands-on training in visual arts, product design, furniture design, and architecture with social science research and studies in the humanities. Using three-dimensional models, computer rendering, and drawing, students explore the various disciplines that collectively are Interior Architecture.

Through studio and seminar courses, students gain the expertise needed to master the essential elements of interior design: form, color, lighting, finishes, and furnishings. Training in appropriate building technology, material science, and behavioral factors gives students the skills to create spatial compositions. In a field of rapidly changing technology and ideas, the program provides students with both the professional and intellectual tools necessary to negotiate this discipline through design and cultural awareness.

The Interior Architecture department is well suited to meet the exciting challenges and opportunities of the interior design profession. Limited enrollment creates a dynamic studio. Here, students receive individualized instruction and interact with an energetic, engaged faculty representing both established and emerging voices in design education and practice. In addition, professional designers and educators from outside the department visit regularly to lecture and review student projects.

Our Interior Architecture program provides students with the knowledge required to pursue a career in interior design. Because Interior Architecture is part of the School of Architecture, it is also critically positioned as a course of study within the architecture discipline. Some architectural endeavors explored in the curriculum include the strong development of three-dimensional spatial design, inquiry into how human behavior impacts the built environment, and the art and science of constructing innovative form.

Although the practice of interior architecture, as opposed to architecture, is affiliated with certain limitations in physical scope, the designs produced by our students impact the world at large. Interior architecture is one of the most direct conduits to building conscientiously and it is a path to groundbreaking and experimental new design.

 

Photo Credits: 5 – Monica Nouwens; 6 – Joshua White Photography

    Apply or Inquire Here.

    If you’re ready to apply to our BFA in Interior Architecture program, you can click the big APPLY button to do so electronically. If you have questions, use this contact form to get in touch with one of Woodbury School of Architecture’s dedicated admissions counselors. Someone will get back to you within 24 hours.

    The admissions counselors will be able to answer all your questions about our programs, scholarships, financial aid, transfer credits, portfolios and anything else. They can also put you in touch with faculty and students who would be happy to talk to you about Woodbury.

    You can initiate a live chat session right now by clicking CHAT.

    Interior Architecture Chair:

    Christoph Korner
    Phone: 818-252-5121
    Email: christoph.korner@woodbury.edu

    Architecture Main Office:

    Nare Gabrielyan
    Phone: 818-252-5121
    Email: nare.gabrielyan@woodbury.edu

    Admissions Counselor:

    Angel Montes
    Phone: 818-767-5222
    Email: angel.montes.@woodbury.edu

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    BFA in Interior Architecture Curriculum

    The BFA program has 128 semester hours with 75 semester hours of major study, 45 semester hours in the liberal arts, and 9 semester hours of open electives. A portfolio review is required for students advancing from the second-year design studios into the upper-division studios, providing an excellent opportunity towards the development of professional marketing material. In addition, students are required to complete 300 hours of work experience, infusing their education with the knowledge gained in a professional interior design or allied design office.

    Fall Semester 1
    INAR 105 Design Studio 1: 3D Design
    As an introductory course in three-dimensional design,
    emphasis is placed on developing skills necessary for
    visualization, representation and creation of three-dimensional
    form. Through descriptive geometry,
    orthographic projection, axonometrics, and model building,
    students study plane, mass and volume as space
    defining elements. Studio. Prerequisite: none.
    ARIA 114 Design Communication 1
    This course introduces various drawing skills used in
    two- and three-dimensional methods and media of representation.
    Methods of perception, technique, composition,
    critical evaluation and presentation are studied
    through representational assignments. Emphasis is
    placed on orthographic projection and documentation
    and constructed hard line drawing techniques. Students
    learn these methods of representation using both digital
    and analog drawing skills and media. Studio. Prerequisite:
    None.
    WRIT 111 Academic Writing 1
    WRIT 111 is an intensive writing course that introduces
    students to university standards for academic writing
    and teaches students how to use the writing process
    and social processes to write for various audiences.
    WRIT 111 students improve their prewriting and
    revision abilities and learn to modify the essay form,
    integrate their opinions and experiences into essays,
    and create multiple-source papers in the MLA format.
    WRIT 111 also includes learning to coordinate first- and
    third-person narration and critiquing readings for bias
    and for other logical fallacies. Seminar. Prerequisite:
    WRIT 100, Bridge to Academic Writing or appropriate
    placement score.
    INDS 1XX Interdisciplinary Core
    One of the following courses:
    INDS 101 Journeys
    INDS 102 Natures
    INDS 103 Conflicts
    INDS 104 Knowledges
    MATH 149 Intermediate Algebra
    This is a beginning course in algebra. Topics include
    polynomials, factoring, algebraic expressions, equations
    in two variables, quadratic equations, and graphing.
    Lecture. Prerequisite: Placement exam or MATH 049,
    Elementary Algebra with a grade of “C” or better.
    PPDV 1/2XX Transition to Woodbury University 1
    This seminar course is highly recommended for all
    freshmen and designed to orient new students to university
    life and achieve greater academic, professional,
    and personal success. Through discussion, activities,
    and reflection exercises, students and faculty work
    together exploring the opportunities and challenges of
    a new learning environment and developing strategies
    to meet students’ developing goals. Course cannot be
    repeated to remediate a non-passing grade.
    Spring Semester 1
    INAR 106 Design Studio 2: 3D Design
    Design Studio 2 provides a continued study of three-dimensional
    design, developing individually defined
    spaces into more complex spatial organizations.
    Students analyze and design projects combining the
    three-dimensional use of color, light and texture with
    simple programs. Descriptive geometry, orthographic
    projection, axonometric, and perspective drawings are
    developed from skills learned in IA 105, Design Studio 1.
    Model building techniques and introduction of computer graphics are developed. Design communication and visualization
    skills are developed using digital media, and
    mixed-media hand drawings and model building. Studio.
    Prerequisite: INAR 105, Design Studio 1.
    FOUN 103 Design and Color Elements 2
    This course continues the exploration of design and
    composition, introducing more complex problems with
    an emphasis on introducing and studying the properties
    and the interaction of color relationships in basic design
    projects. Students develop conceptual, perceptual and
    applied skills in problem-solving projects that investigate
    color systems, color contrasts, color symbolism, and the spatial effects of color in art and design.
    Studio. Prerequisite: FOUN 102, Design and Composition
    recommended.
    ARIA 115 Design Communication 2
    This course develops various drawing skills used in two
    and three-dimensional methods and media of representation.
    Methods of perception, technique, composition, critical evaluation and presentation are studied through
    representational assignments. Emphasis is placed on orthographic
    projection and documentation and constructed
    hard-line drawing techniques. Students learn these
    methods of representation using both digital and analog
    drawing skills and media. Additional skills in diagramming
    and more advanced representation techniques
    develop ideas and skill learned in ARIA 114. Studio.
    Prerequisites: ARIA 114, Design Communication 1 and
    INAR 105, Design Studio 1 and more advanced representation
    techniques develop ideas and skill learned
    in ARIA 114. Studio. Prerequisites: ARIA 114, Design
    Communication 1 and INAR 105, Design Studio 1.
    COMM 120 Public Speaking
    This course provides a study of the oral presentation
    of ideas and feelings that blend contemporary communication
    theory with traditional approaches to public
    address. This course also provides experience in public
    speaking, interpersonal communication, and critical
    listening skills. Lecture. Prerequisite: none. Offered
    spring, summer, and fall. No lab costs.
    WRIT 112 Academic Writing 2
    WRIT 112 is an intensive writing course and is the
    capstone course in the Writing Program. WRIT 112 students
    develop their research and writing skills; practice
    MLA and APA documentation formats; and integrate diverse
    kinds of documents to explore topics, solve problems,
    and develop arguments. WRIT 112 also includes
    elements of document design and field research, and
    completing research into a subject other than English.
    Specifically, the issue of sustainability will be examined
    by each student through the lens of his/her major. While
    studying sustainability, students will critically think,
    read, and write, and study the relationships between
    language, knowledge, and power. Seminar. Prerequisite:
    WRIT 111, Academic Writing I or appropriate placement
    score.
    LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice
    This course is an introduction to the production and
    dissemination of information and knowledge. Using
    networked information systems, traditional scholarly
    resources, and evolving delivery systems, students
    develop an understanding of concepts underlying the
    research process, and skills in retrieval and critical
    evaluation of resources appropriate to university level
    research. Provides experience in the ethical use and
    presentation of research results with correct documentation
    styles, and the application of knowledge and skills
    to research assigned in other courses.
    Fall Semester 2
    INAR 207 Design Studio 3: IA Elements
    Through a series of design projects, students focus on
    specific components of interior architecture such as
    color, light, furniture, materiality, and systems of inhabitation
    in relation to articulating space. Experimental
    exploration of materials and graphic representation
    inform programmatic hybridization in order to develop
    an awareness of social and cultural aspects of space.
    Studio. Prerequisite: INAR 106, Design Studio 2.
    INAR 252 Space Planning
    An introduction to programming, behavioral factors of
    space and proxemics as they apply to the layout and
    planning of interior environments. Several projects of
    increasing complexity examine different programmatic
    requirements. Studio. Prerequisites: INAR 105, Design
    Studio 1.
    INAR 256 Materials and Furnishings
    Applied finishes and specifications for interior architectural
    elements, furniture, fixtures, and textiles are examined through a comprehensive project. Materials,
    manufacturing processes, application of mass-produced
    furniture and surface materials, methods of detailing,
    construction, fabrication, the application of materials in
    custom elements are studied. Estimating and installation
    is introduced. Emphasis is on commercial and
    institutional applications. Studio. Prerequisite: INAR
    105, Design Studio 1: 3-D Design I.
    FOUN 101 Beginning Drawing
    This is a fundamental course in freehand drawing.
    Various media and methods are introduced to develop
    perceptual and technical drawing skills. Emphasis is
    on line, shape, tone, spatial relationships, perspective,
    scale, and composition. Studio. Prerequisite: none.
    INAR 164 Interior Architecture History 1
    This is the first of a three-course survey examining the
    history and theories of interiors and architecture. An
    emphasis is placed on gaining an understanding of the
    plastic arts and their relevance to and impact on the
    larger world: culturally, politically, etc. Significant works
    of furniture, interior spaces and architecture; important
    architects and designers; formal and structural elements;
    periods, styles, theories, and regional differences
    within a given style or period are studied. Lecture.
    Prerequisite: WRIT 111, Academic Writing I.
    MATH 2XX Mathematics Course
    Example:
    MATH 249 College Algebra
    This is a course in algebraic functions. Topics include
    but are not limited to: relations, functions; inverse
    functions; the algebra of functions; polynomial, rational
    exponential, and logarithmic functions. Course content
    is covered in three realms; symbolic, graphic and the
    written word. In addition, each topic includes components
    of problem solving and applications. Lecture.
    Prerequisite: Placement exam or MATH 149, Intermediate
    Algebra with a grade of “C” or better.
    Spring Semester 2
    INAR 282 Design Studio 4: Branding / ID
    Branding, long associated as a marketing strategy, has
    taken on issues of constructing individual identities.
    This studio questions how space responds to and informs
    how specific community and individual identities
    utilize strategies of branding to create meaning in their
    inhabitation of public environments. Studio. Prerequisites:
    INAR 207, Design Studio 3: IA Elements, and
    INAR 252, Space Planning.
    INAR 258 Building Systems and Codes
    This course analyzes construction materials and building
    systems including structural, mechanical, electrical,
    plumbing, lighting, and acoustics as it relates to interior
    spaces. In conjunction with the building systems, this
    course examines building codes related to interior
    architecture. Studio. Prerequisites: INAR 111, Digital
    Communication and INAR 106, Design Studio 2: 3-D
    Design 2, WRIT 111, Academic Writing I.
    ARIA 211 Design Communication 3
    This is an intermediate level course that builds on
    the fundamental skills of architectural representation
    learned in Design Communication 1 and 2. The course
    will take an experimental approach that combines
    hand-drawing and digital tools to explore a variety of
    drawing and representation techniques. Use of alternative
    production methods will be combined with digital
    tools. The class will primarily focus on two-dimensional
    and three-dimensional drawings, but will also expand
    to include physical three-dimensional “constructs” such
    as composite drawings and assemblages. Prerequisites:
    ARIA 115, Design Communication 2 or ARCH 211, Design
    Communication 2.
    INAR 265 Interior Architecture History 2
    This is the second of a three-course survey examining
    the history of interiors and architecture. An emphasis
    is placed on gaining an understanding of the plastic
    arts and their relevance to and impact on the larger
    world: culturally, politically, etc. The course identifies
    significant works of furniture, interior spaces and
    architecture; important architects and designers; formal
    and structural elements; periods, styles, theories, and regional differences from the industrial revolution until
    the 1960’s. Lecture. Prerequisites: INAR 164, Interior
    Architecture History 1 (recommended) and WRIT 112,
    Academic Writing II.
    ENVT 220 Environmental Studies
    This course provides an overview of topics including
    ecosystems, biodiversity, mineral and nutrient cycles,
    sources of energy, waste and pollution, and environmental
    movements and philosophies. Lecture. Prerequisites:
    none.
    Fall Semester 3
    INAR 363 Design Studio 5: Dwelling and Culture
    This studio questions how culture is represented in the
    media and how those representations define a design
    project that questions assumptions on how we live as a
    society. The studio strives to develop design strategies
    that engage in our understanding of changing ways of
    dwelling as this act is informed by cultural specificity.
    Studio. Prerequisites: INAR 282, Studio 4: Branding
    and Identity; permission of the department chair; and
    successful portfolio review.
    INAR 366 Contemporary Interior Architecture History and Theory
    This course situates historically a diversity of critical
    and generative approaches to late twentieth century
    design while introducing current themes and debates in
    contemporary design practice and related disciplines.
    The course is structured around a topic-based organization
    allowing the exploration of contemporary theories
    as they have developed over the past fifty years. An
    emphasis is placed on gaining an understanding of the
    plastic arts and their relevance to and impact on the
    larger world: culturally, politically, etc. Significant works
    of furniture, interior spaces and architecture; important
    architects and designers; formal and structural elements;
    periods, styles, theories, and regional differences
    within a given style or period are identified. Lecture.
    Prerequisites: INAR 265, IA History 2 (recommended)
    and WRIT 112, Academic Writing II.
    INAR 259 Tectonics 1: Material Logic
    This course provides a studio-based exploration of
    the impact of materiality and fabrication in both the
    generation and reading of form and space. This will
    be addressed through readings, discussions, exercises
    and design/build projects. Issues of craft and technique
    as they affect the design process will be addressed in
    both two and three-dimensions. An intuitive knowledge
    of material properties and processes will be gained
    through full-scale, hands-on exploration. Detailing, construction
    and fabrication methods, and the application
    of materials in custom elements are studied through
    individual or group projects closely related to the body
    in scale or use. Formal, conceptual, and programmatic
    solutions are studied through a specific design strategy/
    process as assigned by the instructor with an emphasis
    on new or hybrid programs/functions. Studio. Prerequisites:
    INAR 106, Design Studio 2: 3-D Design 2.
    PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology
    This course introduces students to the basic concepts of
    psychology and the psychological processes of perception,
    learning, thinking, motivation, personality, development,
    and social behavior. Lecture. Prerequisite:
    WRIT 111, Academic Writing I.
    Natural Science with a Lab
    For example:
    BIOL 232 Botany
    This course is an introduction to selected topics in plant
    biology. Topics include the structure of plant cells, the
    structure of roots, stems, leaves, and flowers, reproduction
    in plants, genetics of plants, diversity of plant life,
    and characteristics of various groups of plants. Laboratory.
    Prerequisite: none.
    WORK Work Experience
    (Students must complete 128 hours of work experience with an interior designer or allied professional.)
    INAR 365 Lighting Design
    This course is an introduction to the basic design and
    technical requirements of lighting systems. Studio. Prerequisite:
    INAR 258, Building Systems & Codes.
    Spring Semester 3
    INAR 382 Design Studio 6: Community and Typology
    Typologies have long been used as a tool for generating
    meaning in design that ties back to historical and
    cultural references. As a strategy for understanding
    common characteristics, typologies assist in creating
    community identity. This studio explores the ambivalence
    between community identification and individual
    participation. Studio. Prerequisites: INAR 363, Design
    Studio 5: Dwelling and Culture and INAR 259, Tectonics
    I: Material Logic.
    INAR 328 Tectonics 2: Detail Design
    This course studies materials and methods of detailing,
    fabrication, documentation, and specification for custom
    work. Emphasis is placed on detailing as a design
    process. Students learn detailing techniques through
    research, observation and architectural documentation
    of non-structural elements of contemporary or modern
    design. Elements observed and documented may range
    from furniture and interior casework to nonstructural,
    exterior building elements (custom screens, trellis,
    etc.). Materials and their integration, application, and/
    or connections are emphasized. Students are directed
    through research, conceptual design/diagramming,
    schematic design, and design development to the final
    production of a comprehensive project documenting
    design resolutions of a given project through detailed
    technical drawings and models. Studio. Prerequisites:
    INAR 258, Building Systems & Codes; INAR 259, Tectonics
    I: Material Logic; and INAR 207, Design Studio 3:
    IA Elements.
    Social Science Course
    ARTH 2XX Art History Course
    Example:
    ARTH 204 History of Modern Art
    This course will seek to create a historical narrative
    from c. 1860 to the period immediately following WWII
    by outlining the major artistic movements and theories
    in modern art. Focusing primarily on the art of Europe
    and the United States, students will also study design,
    architecture, and film in order to observe the characteristics
    of progress and originality that often define
    avant-garde modernism. Lecture. Prerequisite: none.
    Unrestricted Elective
    INAR 454 Construction Documents
    Graphic conventions and the organization of working
    drawings are studied through a comprehensive project.
    A brief survey of the legal nature and scope of the construction
    document package (contractual agreements,
    conditions, drawings, modifications, and specifications)
    is presented. Studio. Prerequisite: INAR 258, Building
    Systems & Codes; INAR 282, Design Studio 4: Branding
    and Identity; INAR 327, Tectonic 2: Detail Design
    recommended.
    Fall Semester 4
    INAR 480 Design Studio 7: Narrative and Media
    Working on the assumption that space houses the
    stories of the people who inhabit it, this studio explores
    how stories of communities and individuals inform design.
    The media used to communicate these narrations
    require the development of technological and performative
    strategies of expression. Studio. Prerequisite: INAR
    382, Design Studio 6 Community and Typology.
    INAR 482 Senior Project Seminar
    Through self-directed study and research, students
    develop a project proposal for their senior project. The
    course is broken into four modules that deal with the
    main components of the Interior Architecture senior
    project: program development, conceptual thesis, site analysis, and generative strategies. Through weekly
    meetings and seminars, students discuss their research
    as it progresses to a final senior project proposal.
    Prerequisites: INAR 366, Contemporary IA History and
    Theories.
    PHIL 210 Ethical Systems
    INDS 340 Human Agency and Interior Space
    Spring Semester 4
    INAR 451 Professional Practice
    Students gain an understanding of basic business
    concepts, practices, procedures and documents as
    they relate to interior architecture with an emphasis on
    ethical and legal issues. Lecture. Prerequisites: INAR
    256, Materials & Furnishings and INAR 258, Building
    Systems & Codes.
    INAR 483 Senior Project
    Seniors
    develop a comprehensive project during their final
    semester in the program. Students present their projects
    in a public forum attended by outside professionals
    and faculty members from the School of Architecture
    and the Interior Architecture Department. The
    IA department is developing further opportunities
    for project assessments. Developing a review of the
    projects during the week prior to commencement by
    the faculty without the students present can provide
    an opportunity to evaluate overall strengths and
    weaknesses of the curriculum.
    XXXX 3XX Integrative Learning Elective
    Restricted Design Elective
    Unrestricted Elective

    Student Experiences

    • Transferring to Woodbury was one of the best decisions I have ever made. Now I get better opportunities with internships and future industry careers with the help of honest and caring faculty and staff. Plus, nothing is better than working late nights with my studio family.

      Maria Kobalyan

      BFA, IA 2016
    • The career outreach at Woodbury University is a very beneficial tool for students looking for internships or jobs. The career outreach coordinator helped me step by step on what I need to do to be accepted for my summer internship. It is just one example of how much Woodbury University cares for their students to succeed.

      Ari Danaci

      BFA, IA 2016
    • I was able to work throughout the four years while attending Woodbury University since the staff was so encouraging to be a part of the industry. I had two internships throughout my educational career which allowed me to network within the field of Interior Architecture to understand the industry from a professional level.

      Jillian Miller

      BFA, IA 2014